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Push for changing the building standards and codes to allow smaller, more sustainable, more AFFORDABLE homes

Advocate and put pressure on the necessary entities to change building standards to allow smaller, more sustainable, more Affordable homes to be built.

Why tie up a family's income for decades paying for a house that is larger than what they need? Look at the size of post WW I & II houses. Large, happy families were raised in these smaller homes.

Today's large houses put money in the BUILDER's pockets while sucking it out of the pockets of middle-class Americans. Larger mortgages mean more money to banks and less to be spent strengthening the economy, they add stress to homeowners, and reduce the number of middle-class and below Americans who can afford to become homeowners.

If we want to truly make housing more affordable, then smaller, greener, more efficient, more sustainable homes are the way to do it.

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    Anonymous shared this idea  ·   ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →

    9 comments

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      • Trish commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        I support this in conjunction with land preservation - for future generations.

        The US should conserve its natural resources. Particularly for low cost housing, this means parking must be underground, and residences should be constructed upwards. Available land is finite and US population is rapidly growing.

      • Dana Libby commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        So many possibilities now exist for providing safe decent housing for the many homeless neighbors. Consider creation of the equivalent of "Single Room Occupancy" homes in industrial or otherwise disused property, through tiny homes or one of the many disaster housing possibilities in development. The site would be established for 24 to 36 months lifespan - then shifted to a new location. Existing local government standards and planning requirements make such measures nearly impossible.

      • Gerry Cooper commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        I am totally on board with the tiny house movement. If HUD ever develops a division or staff to this endeavor...please keep me in mind! It is one of my passions. Probably drive my boss and her boss crazy because every time they ask me what further I'd like to pursue my answer always involves green living and the tiny house movement.

      • Anonymous commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        You could start with Japanese style lockable sleeping booths, that allow someone to have a suitcase and some clothes with them. The Japanese have these in train stations, for business who miss the last train. It would be kinder than the current open barracks model in many homeless shelters.

      • Anonymous commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        A program that might actually help homeless people? You can be sure this will go nowhere.

      • Teal Brown commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        RVIA uses NFPA 1192 as their Travel Trailer manufacturing standard. Although this is effective in addressing the safety of electrical and plumbing systems through thorough testing procedures, it lacks in other departments. For one, there are no guidelines for actual construction methods. That means a builder could manufacture a beautiful home with operable mechanical, electrical, and plumbing systems, but it might fall off the trailer or just fall apart. I think HUD should establish some building standards.

        --

        Another option altogether might be to collaborate with RVIA so that they are comfortable embracing the tiny house movement. Let them know what would be considered working within their jurisdiction. Their concern is that tiny home manufacturers are marketing their products as actual homes for full time living.

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